NFHS-Appeal after a balk or illegal pitch

  • Post
    John Gelatt
    Participant
    Situation 1-1 out and R2, base hit and R2 misses 3rd and scores, batter advances to 2nd

    For whatever reason, time is called and and the coach tells the pitcher to get on the rubber and to throw to 3rd when the umpire puts the ball in play. (We know that there can be an verbal appeal while the ball is dead and do not have to put the ball in play)

    The ball is in play and the pitcher does not properly disengage from the rubber, balk, immediate dead ball (NFHS) we award R2 third (for the balk). Does the defense lose the right to still appeal the missed base?

    Situation 2-1 out and R3, fly ball to RF ball is caught, but R3 leaves early and scores.

    The ball is still in play and while having his foot in contact with the rubber, F1 places his pitching on his mouth and distinctly wipes off his pitching hand prior to touching the ball (Illegal pitch-a ball to the batter-NFHS)

    Can the defense still appeal after an illegal?

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  • Replies
      Stan Dyer
      Participant
      Situation 1 and Situation 2 – By NFHS rules, the appealing team does not lose its right to appeal because of a balk.  I do not think it would be different for college, either, except that in Situation 2 touching the hand to the mouth while in contact with the pitcher’s plate is not a balk.  It’s only a balk in high school because it is considered the start of the pitching motion.
      John Gelatt
      Participant
      I had help from another forum and this is what I got:

      <b>FED Official Interpretation:</b>  <b>Rumble:</b>  A “balk is also an illegal pitch,” so a balk would cancel the right of the defense to appeal. (Website 2003 #6)

      2003 NFHS Baseball Rule Interpretations <b>SITUATION 6:</b> With a runner at second base and two outs, the batter hits a single to right field. The runner misses third base and scores. The defense does not immediately appeal, and the ball is made live. With a right-handed pitcher on the mound, in contact with the pitcher’s plate, the pitcher illegally turns his shoulders to check the runner. A balk is called, and the runner is awarded second base. With the ball being dead, the defensive coach asks for an appeal of the runner missing third base. Is the defense allowed to appeal? <b>RULING:</b>No, the pitcher’s balk constitutes an illegal pitch and the defense loses the right to appeal the base runner’s error. (2-3-1, 8-2-5 Penalty)

      tzemaitis
      Participant
      Per Jaksa/Roder: p.73 2.) If there is a runner, it is not a balk when an in-contact pitcher throws to an unoccupied base to appeal.

      Thus, situation 1 is incorrect, and this play is not a balk, rule on the appeal…the pitcher is not required to disengage in NFHS unless he is in the windup position where he can only pitch or step off. From the set, he is eligible to throw to all bases with a step. However, if the pitcher made some other movement which did constitute a balk, it would be considered a play and the appeal would no longer be possible.

      Situation 2: The defense only loses it’s right to appeal if it initiates a play. Since the hand to mouth is an illegal action resulting in an illegal pitch, you have a play (balk or ball award), the defense is no longer eligible to appeal.

        tzemaitis
        Participant
        First, a balk or an illegal pitch is considered a play by the offense so “no” they cannot still appeal the play.  However, the pitcher does not need to disengage from the rubber in the set position to throw to third for an appeal so that would not be a balk.  In NFHS, from the wind up, the pitcher can only step off or pitch so a throw to third would be considered an illegal pitch/balk if he did not properly disengage.
      Ken Aubin
      Participant
      I think he can still appeal. A pitch has not been made !
        Ken Aubin
        Participant
        Can still appeal. A pitch has not been delivered
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