March 28, 2022

Four Outs in an Inning? It Can Happen! Here’s how…

Four Outs in an Inning? It Can Happen! Here’s how…

Comments

Vincenzo Russo

As soon as the pitcher caught the line drive, It’not a force play anymore, but a time play, then if R3 scored before the 3rd out the run counts. Of course, defensive team could appeal R3 left the bag too soon.

Ptaylor

Thank you C3GPS.
Great thing about baseball—you can always learn more.
I used to love listening to the great Joe Morgan call a game and even he would admit no one knows everything.

C3GPS

Ptaylor, no that would not be a force play. That is an appeal that the runner left early. A force is when a runner is forced to go to the next base because of the actions of a batter. If a run scores before an appeal at a base, it is a time play.

Ptaylor

Very interesting. BUT if the runner at second had not tagged up (which I believe is what Chris is describing) then this is a force play at 2nd base. They tagged him, but they didn’t have to. If they just threw to second and touched the base the runner was out and the inning is over. That would not be a time play, correct? So therefore with the 3rd out (2nd of a double play) being a force the run wouldn’t count regardless of when he crossed home, correct? The way I see it then would be the run wouldn’t count because out 3 was a force whether they tagged the runner or stepped on the base. I question Mr. Gibson that it was up to the D-backs to stay on the field to appeal the play at home.

Ptaylor

Very interesting. BUT if the runner at second had not tagged up (which I believe is what Chris is describing) then this is a force play at 2nd base. In other words the runner does not have the option of just trying to make it safely to 3rd—he must get back to 2nd safely. They tagged him, but they didn’t have to. If they just threw to second and touched the base the runner was out and the inning is over. That would not be a time play, correct? So therefore with the 3rd out (2nd of a double play) being a force the run wouldn’t count regardless of when he crossed home, correct? The way I see it then would be the run wouldn’t count because out 3 was a force whether they tagged the runner or stepped on the base. I question Mr. Gibson that it was up to the D-backs to stay on the field to appeal the play at home. Does the 3rd out being a force play only apply on conventional double play (ground out to 2nd then 1st)? If so then I am wrong. If I am correct then the D-backs AND the umps made a mistake

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