Greg Spencer

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  • Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    Zachary:
    I don’t think my post went through so I’ll try again. Highandin: Why would you would you call a strike for not avoiding the pitch in OBR? It’s only a strike if the ball hits you in the strike zone. Otherwise it’s just a ball and you bring the batter back.

    Same in NFHS/FED.

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    Highandin:
    First, apologies Greg! I screwed up on my scroll up!
    I’ve called Babe Ruth games, using OBR, and have rung up strikes on guys who stepped out…and there it has to be a strike… and people were NOT happy. I’ve also rung up a strike for not avoiding and allowing the ball to hit you. I can only guess at the howling that would go on if 1. guy steps out with two feet and you award 2 strikes or, and this was the one I was really interested in, 2. guy steps out with one or two feet and gets drilled and you award a strike(s) for a pitch that is outside the batter’s box!

    I assume it was a strike as in it was in the strike zone when he let it hit him?

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    Ben Levin:
    Under no circumstance can a runner advance if the batter commits backswing interference.
    But there is a VERY MAJOR rule difference between High School/NFHS rule code and the OBR and NCAA rule.
    In OBR and NCAA, the runners are simply returned to their bases – no one is called out.
    In High School baseball, THE BATTER IS OUT if he commits backswing interference (the NFHS rule book calls it “follow-through interference”). This is in addition to the penalty that all runners return. If the follow-through interference occurs on a third strike, the batter is already out, so the runner on which the play was being attempted would also be ruled out.

    One correction: NFHS – strike 3 interference – an umpire CAN be called out but it’s not automatic. Judgement call. Say a runner gets a huge jump and no one goes to cover 2nd base. The runner is not out – he returns to first.

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    Chris Welsh:

    A fly ball that meets all the requirements for an infield fly, but is not declared as such, is not an infield fly. Resulting action is allowed; however, the umpires should not allow a double play that the infield fly rule was intended to prevent. [NFHS 10.2.3g] [NCAA 2-48]

    Chris, I’m not sure exactly what that last sentence is saying.
    The NFHS rulebook and casebook say that even if the umpire fails to signify IFF it’s still IFF it it meets the requirements. We don’t make any adjustments to the rule just because we failed to signal.

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    Michael Harwell:
    R1 on first base, B1 hits a pop fly to shallow RF that should a routine fly ball for 2b but they drop the ball but was able to throw out R1 with a force out at 2nd
    FC or error

    An error has to result in an advantage/potential advantage gained by the offense.

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160
    And I’d say , unless otherwise mentioned, since it doesn’t mention location of the pitch it’s a strike for having 2 feet out of the box.
    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160
    For the record, it was Tenduramax2 who posted about “dead ball/ball 4.”
    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160
    Call the pitch a ball or a strike. Runner scores unless it’s strike 3 with 2 outs. NFHS rules.
    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    djorissen:
    If the umpire calls catcher’s interference on a swing that results in a foul ball, can the offensive manager choose to accept the foul ball instead of the batter being put on first base? In other words, does a foul ball — or swing and a miss — meet the criteria for a “play” that can be accepted by the offensive manager instead of the CI award of the batter advancing to 1B.

    The offensive coach can decline the award.

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160

    tenduramax2:
    The direct answer to your specific question is that the pitcher is ejected for unsportsman’s like conduct which supersedes everything else.

    I just wanted to add these two scenarios I’ve seen and now I handled each.

    1. The batter is not granted time, steps out of the box and is unintentionally hit by the pitch:

    Dead ball ball unless it’s ball 4 in which case he takes his base & no runners may advance unless forced.

    2. The batter steps out without time causing the pitcher to balk either intentionally or unintentionally:

    Dead ball, nullify the balk caused by the batter and simply do over. No runners may advance.

    p.s.

    I don’t think the pitcher would throw at the batter intentionally in the situation.

    In scenario two if both feet are out of the box it’s a strike.

    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160
    The questions would only arise if the ball was not caught. If the defense does not retire the batter at first base he will be safe (and I will have to eat it with the defensive coach).
    Greg Spencer
    Participant
    1160
    The high school is clear on this: If BOTH feet are out of the box AND the pitcher delivers a pitch it is TWO strikes. It doesn’t provide exception such as HBP.

     

     

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