Jens

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  • Jens
    Participant
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    Jens
    Participant
    They may tag him, but it’s enough to just step on the base. It’s an appeal play.
    Jens
    Participant
    Hi,

    they can leave whenever they want, as with any fly ball, and if the ball drops, they may advance, otherwise they need to return to their base.

    The infield fly call simply removes the force play situation, so the runners can stay at their base even if the ball drops.

    That is the idea of the infield fly rule, to protect the runners from easy double/triple plays by letting an easily catchable fly ball in the infield drop.

    See OBR definition of terms/infield fly regarding this.

    Hope this helps!

    Jens
    Participant
    It’s obstruction by the short stop, since without a throw he cannot be in the act of fielding. See the comment regarding 6.01 (h) in the OBR.
    Jens
    Participant
    Hi JD,

    here is how I see it (under the condition that the batter runner does not intentionally interfere with the fielder):

    • I agree that rule 6.01 a(1) is not applicable, since the catcher has been able to field the ball.
    • 6.01 a(3), however, is IMO not applicable either, since that only applies to the batter, and this batter has already become a (batter-)runner when the third strike was not caught
    • You can’t call him out for abandoning base path after third strike not caught, since he hasn’t left the dirt circle surrounding home plate (see 5.05 (a)(2) Comment)

    Therefore, since we have a runner who unintentionally hinders a fielder fielding a thrown ball, I would say that there is no rule violation and the ball remains in play.

    Jens
    Participant
    I would say a dropped third strike is different, in this case it’s an interference by the batter-runner according to 6.01 (a) (1).

    An injury of the batter-runner does in and of itself not change anything. Of course, if the actions of the catcher are unsportsmanlike, he will be ejected, but the batter is still out for the interference.

Viewing 6 replies - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

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