Stan Dyer

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  • Stan Dyer
    Participant
    He could be awarded the bases, but it is my understanding that a player cannot return to touch a base missed once the ball has gone out of play.  So, the umpire might award the bases, and the runner might touch every base going back, but, if the defense appealed the missed base, the runner would be out.  “Last Time By” does not apply in this instance.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    Situation 1 and Situation 2 – By NFHS rules, the appealing team does not lose its right to appeal because of a balk.  I do not think it would be different for college, either, except that in Situation 2 touching the hand to the mouth while in contact with the pitcher’s plate is not a balk.  It’s only a balk in high school because it is considered the start of the pitching motion.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    I have not been able to locate any recent copies.  I saw where one company offered them, but they were sold out.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    As far as I know, this is only illegal in certain states.  Texas is the only state where I have heard of this being illegal.  I do not believe it is addressed in the “general” Little League Rule Book, but there may be adoptions by local associations.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    To be absolutely certain about whether or not it is a passed ball, you would have to see the play.  If the catcher had no reasonable opportunity to catch the ball, (highly unlikely if it is a third strike), then it could be ruled a wild pitch, and not an error on the catcher.  If, however, the catcher just boots it, and it should have been caught, then it would be a “strikeout” with an error on the catcher.  Since the error occurred, it cannot be a fielder’s choice.  The runner is safe at first on an error, and the runner is out at home on a failed attempt to steal.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    It’s funny that you would bring this up.  I had a coach ask me about the very same thing.  I concur with your interpretation.  Since it is legal by NFHS rules to “feint” to third, it is legal to throw to a fielder who is not in position to make a play.  I do not think all states interpret this the same way, and you should check with your home state rules interpreter for clarification.

    In our state, the pitcher can, indeed, feint to third, but, if he turns and throws to first, he must disengage first, or it is a balk.

    If I were you, I would keep doing it the way I was doing it until someone in a position of authority told me to do it differently.  You will get some flack from different coaches, and even some umpires, but, when you are Umpire in Chief, it’s your game, and your call – be consistent, and be confident.  Never assume any coach, player, or even another umpire knows the rules better than you do, and never assume you know them well enough not to continue studying.

    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    In the first example, it is illegal for the pitcher to take signs from the catcher when not engaged with the pitcher’s plate.  This is a balk.  There is, however, no balk simply for throwing to a base from behind the pitcher’s plate.  It is an important distinction because, as a “fielder,” a ball thrown out of play would be a two base award.  If the pitcher were engaged with the pitcher’s plate when he threw out of play, the award would only be one base.

    In the second example, I see this a lot.  It is difficult for the plate umpire to see this, but it is legal as long as pitcher has the ball, and the team is not trying a hidden ball trick.  If the pitcher took the same stance without the ball, it would be a balk.

    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    It depends a lot on what level you are playing.  Some lower levels require teams to bat the entire lineup with “free substitution,” and, thus, lineups are only necessary for the people keeping the books.  At high school, and above, however, the Umpire in Chief needs to keep track of the lineup of both teams for a variety of reasons, so he/she needs to know each teams starting lineup, and who is playing where.

    It’s not really “mandatory” to exchange lineups at the plate meeting, but it is a good idea for good, accurate officiating.  A lot of teams really don’t know the rules that well, and having the lineup can help an umpire sort out any difficulties that occur.  Whether lineups are exchanged or not, they become official at the Plate Meeting, and can only be changed in accordance with the rules.  Having the lineup of each team in hand also helps in preventative officiating.  The Umpire in Chief can go over the lineup, and point out any discrepancies ahead of time, and before they become a problem

    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    The batter is only out if he hits the ball with one foot entirely outside the batter’s box. In this instance, I am assuming the umpire does not have enough time to call “time,” but, if he did have enough time, and he saw the batter’s foot was not in the box, he should call time, and instruct the batter to get in the box.
    On the play you mentioned, it would still be a strike, but a good umpire would point out to the batter that his foot was out of the batter’s box, and put him back in the box. The Batter’s Box rule only requires a batter to keep one foot in the Batter’s Box at all times. If he steps out, either intentionally, or inadvertently, the ball remains live, and the umpire calls the pitch either “ball,” or “strike.” In high school by NFHS rules, the umpire could call two strikes on such a play – one for stepping out of the box, and one for the pitch.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    As if there weren’t enough confusion already.  Most umpires don’t completely understand the original rule, let alone teams and players.  I still get teams that try to use the “college” DH rule.  Now, our State has made a rule exception of its own to this, and is allowing the player/DH who is either the pitcher or the catcher in addition to the DH to have a Courtesy Runner, too.  They say it’s one of their “speed up” rules.
    Stan Dyer
    Participant
    No.  If the ball had been a ball, it would already be called, and the judgment could not be changed.  If the ball already was a strike, then swinging the bat would make no difference anyway.
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