tzemaitis

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  • tzemaitis
    Participant
    If you adjudge that F6 had an opportunity to field the ball, then this is interference on R2.   Protection of a fielder can change during the course of a play as it did in this situation from F5 to F6.  As an aside, if a fielder and a runner collide, you can’t have “nothing”.  You must adjudge interference or obstruction. The only exceptions are the immediate time after a fielder has completed an attempt at fielding a thrown ball such as a 1st baseman and a runner trying to go to second base on an overthrow or tangle/untangle at home plate.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    In addition to the above, runners advance to the next base.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    Per Jaksa/Roder: p.73 2.) If there is a runner, it is not a balk when an in-contact pitcher throws to an unoccupied base to appeal.

    Thus, situation 1 is incorrect, and this play is not a balk, rule on the appeal…the pitcher is not required to disengage in NFHS unless he is in the windup position where he can only pitch or step off. From the set, he is eligible to throw to all bases with a step. However, if the pitcher made some other movement which did constitute a balk, it would be considered a play and the appeal would no longer be possible.

    Situation 2: The defense only loses it’s right to appeal if it initiates a play. Since the hand to mouth is an illegal action resulting in an illegal pitch, you have a play (balk or ball award), the defense is no longer eligible to appeal.

    tzemaitis
    Participant
    First, a balk or an illegal pitch is considered a play by the offense so “no” they cannot still appeal the play.  However, the pitcher does not need to disengage from the rubber in the set position to throw to third for an appeal so that would not be a balk.  In NFHS, from the wind up, the pitcher can only step off or pitch so a throw to third would be considered an illegal pitch/balk if he did not properly disengage.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    NFHS ruling difference only applies if runner is stealing on the pitch.  If so, the batter is out, and the runner is returned…unless you had two strikes in which the batter was already out so you would get the runner as well.   In OBR, the batter is safe, and the stealing runner is returned to TOP.  However, under NFHS rules if the contact takes the catcher down, dropping the ball, and the runner begins his advance as a result of the backswing interference, then “time” is called and the runner is simply returned to his TOP base with the batter remaining at the plate.  This scenario would be in line with OBR.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    This is umpire judgement in the intent of the batter-runner.   If it is believed that the batter is doing this to intentionally confuse the defense then unsportsmanlike behavior will apply, and the umpire can warn/eject/ and/or return all runners…this would be considered “making a travesty of the game”. However, if this were a single incident and the batter runner truly thought somehow this might be ball four/strike three and he was entitled to run then you have nothing.  The defense does have an obligation to know the status of the game and what their options are as well. They simply could have made a play on the runner as he is in jeopardy once he leaves his base. Since a batter is entitled to run to first on ball four/strike three, I don’t see where any umpire would consider his actions inappropriate. I also don’t understand why you say a runner going from first to second is done to “trick” the catcher as it’s typical behavior for a runner to go from first to second.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    All bases must be retouched in the reverse order or be subject to being called out on appeal. .  “Last time by” would not apply in your proposed situation as cutting across the diamond would be an egregious miss of the base which then nullifies the ability to use of “last time by”.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    This would be a legal tag if the second baseman was able to maintain control of the ball to the point he can exhibit voluntary release.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    Never go past the middle of the catcher’s helmet as you will be exposed to a significantly higher number of foul balls…very dangerous.  In fact, moving over behind the catcher is not as preferred as trying to set up higher in your stance so you might be able to see.  At advanced levels, the umpire will also make mention to the batter that it’s difficult for us to see if he stands there.  By rule, you can’t ask him to move, but in casual conversation many batters will  move back and/or the catcher will also move a bit to give you a window.  Unfortunately, some times you will just get blocked out and you will have to work very hard to read the catcher receiving the ball to give you enough information to call ball/strikes.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    The OBR/NCAA runner, if he’s still in play and not in the dugout, must retouch home, third, second, and first before accepting his award to third base without touching a forward base first. If not, he would be subject to being called out on appeal.  For example, if an OBR/NCAA runner was between 2nd and 3rd when the ball went out of play, the runner could not continue forward touching third, and then begin his retreat to second and first…he must immediately retreat and touch second base and then first before advancing.  NFHS ruling is different on this play as the runner is only allowed to retreat to one base at all ..in this case, first base…to retouch legally.  Although a runner in NFHS could physically retouch all bases in your example before advancing on his award, he would be subject to be called out on appeal as he defined his base as home plate as soon as he re-touched it after the ball going out of play.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    As your post questions the application versus the spirit of the rule, you are correct.  As an umpire, it is your judgement whether the ball could be “caught with reasonable effort”.  Thus, you can cite conditions which may make it unreasonable to catch which often includes wind, sun position, etc. …and at lower levels, the age of the players.  We pregame these items on certain fields all the time to be patient on calling infield fly.  The players have a responsibility to continue to play, and the batter is typically safe at first if he runs after the ball is hit high enough to be an infield fly…especially if the fielders didn’t move into position to catch it in the air, it would take some time for them to pick it up off the ground from their standing positions.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    Generally regarded as the last 60 ft of ball flight.  Imagine in MLB an outfielder who can throw the ball 350 ft towards home…you wouldn’t start saying the catcher is protected when the fielder releases the ball that far away.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    The runner who got HBP and sprinted down to 1st is in a dead ball situation for the HBP.  The umpire should not put the ball back in play until after he’s re-touched first so it would be impossible to call him out over running 1st in this situation.
    tzemaitis
    Participant
    NFHS 5-1-1-H  ball becomes immediately dead when: (h) the umpire handles a live ball…runners would be returned to the base last acquired at the time of touching

     

    OBR may be different.  Earlier versions of the rule book stated:

    OBR 5.12 (b) 5 : If the umpire wishes to inspect the ball, he shall call time.  If the umpire otherwise handles a live ball, but the umpire releases the ball immediately, the ball remains live; otherwise the ball is dead.

    However, the 2020 rule book states OBR 5.12 (b) 5: Calling “time” and dead balls – (5) when the umpire wishes to examine the ball, consult with either manager, or for any similar cause.

    I’m not sure when OBR changed the verbiage on this section of the book or for what reason. Since, it was changed, I would infer that MLB would want it to be a dead ball, but without a reference remaining in the book, we can’t be sure.

     

    tzemaitis
    Participant
    NFHS 10.2.3(g) case book play: With R2 on second, and R1 on first and no outs, B3 hits an infield fly, but the umpire fails to call “infield fly” Is the infield fly in effect or not?  RULING: Even though the infield fly rule was not announced by the umpire, it is still in effect.  Both teams have the responsibility to know when conditions exist for an infield fly.

     

    The Jaksa/Roder manual makes reference to the relevant high school rules, but does not delineate whether it is consistent or inconsistent with OBR.

    On page 231 (back of book) for the Jaksa/Roder manual reads “NFHS 10.2.3g – The situation, not the declaration of the umpire, determines whether the batter-runner is out on an infield fly. Thus, if all conditions are met for an infield fly but it is not declared, the batter-runner is still out, and the play (including all other outs gained) stands.

    On page 235, NCAA 2-48: The NCAA simply states that the ball is live during a declared or undeclared infield fly and the runners can advance at their own risk.

     

    Thus, you’ve discovered a fine point differential.  NFHS – it is an infield fly regardless  NCAA/OBR – it is a live ball played on unless a double play is obtained by the defense for failure to call a qualified infield fly in which case, the umpires would rectify the situation.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)

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