Insider Report(view all)

Brewers Bat Out of Turn

The Brewers batted out of turn in their 1-0 victory over the Nationals on July 4, 2016. Here is what happened: The official Brewers lineup card handed to the umpires and Nats’ manager Dusty Baker had Jonathan Lucroy batting third, Ryan Braun in the No. 4 slot and Aaron Hill batting fifth. In the bottom of the first inning Braun, incorrectly batting in Lucroy’s number 3 spot, collected a two-out single off Nationals’ pitcher Max…

The Brewers batted out of turn in their 1-0 victory over the Nationals on July 4, 2016. Here is what happened: The official Brewers lineup card handed to the umpires and Nats’ manager Dusty Baker had Jonathan Lucroy batting third, Ryan Braun in the No. 4 slot and Aaron Hill batting fifth. In the bottom of the first inning Braun, incorrectly batting in Lucroy’s number 3 spot, collected a two-out single off Nationals’ pitcher Max…

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...manager to remain mute and use the rule to his advantage later in the game if the Dodgers had continued to bat out of turn.

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1 reply
  1. andersjim
    andersjim says:

    RE: “[6.03(b)(3)] The correct batter (as written in the official order) is called out, and play resumes with the next batter in the sequence.”

    Hmm. It seems in the situation where the incorrect batter bats and then the defensive coach appeals, the batter almost always ends up batting twice in a row as he is usually the “the correct batter” after the “skipped” batter. This could get pretty weird strategy-wise. Obviously smart defensive coaches when they notice a batter batting out of order wait until the batter gets a hit before appealing so they get the out. But what if the batter does not reach? Once a pitch is thrown to the next batter, a batter now has been skipped without penalty.

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